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An Exhibition Exploring Themes of Uncomfortable History // Difficult Heritage
BACKLIT Gallery Nottingam
4th – 26th May 2019
Private View – 3rd May 6pm
BACKLIT Gallery
Alfred House, Ashley Street, Nottingham, NG3 1JG
Exhibition Opening Times (unless otherwise specified)
Friday, Saturday & Sunday 12–5pm
Tel: 0115 837 2426
uncomfortablehistory.wordpress.com
Email: uncomfortablehistories@gmail.com
Twitter: @UncomfHistoriesUncomfortable Histories:Artistic Responses

The artistic responses will be presented in the form of an exhibition within the city of Nottingham from 4th to 26th May at the BACKLIT Gallery, with potential workshops and film screenings. https://uncomfortablehistory.wordpress.com/

The AHRC have just announced the second year of a successful scheme that will be of particular interest to M3C students conducting research into television or media more broadly, providing a unique opportunity to attend the Edinburgh Television Festival (ETF) and participate in a specifically curated programme of events at one of the television industry’s most important events (http://www.thetvfestival.com/). The scheme is only open to PhD students funded by a doctoral training partnership or equivalent. I have attached the details and application guidance with this email and would encourage anyone working in the field of television studies, or with a research angle directed to television and media, to discuss this opportunity with their supervisors. 

One of our Midlands3Cities students, Ayesha Camera-Taylor, was successful in this competition last year and it opened the door to unique and prestigious internship with the BBC, which she is currently undertaking.

Please note the deadline for applications is 1 May 2019

 

 University of York, 28th – 29th June 2019. Venue: Huntingdon Room, The King’s Manor, Exhibition Square, York, YO1 7EP

 Belonging in Late Medieval Cities aims to explore how ideas of belonging might be utilized in the study of late medieval cities. 

The papers have been carefully chosen so that the conference showcases research regarding an array of geographical areas, with the aim that this will foster discussion between delegates concerning the parallels and differences in the mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion within different urban contexts. 

The cost of student registration is only £10 for the two days. The fee includes refreshments and lunch on both days as well as registration for the two keynote lectures, and the following wine receptions, which will take place on the evenings of the 28th and 29th. 

Please see the programme attached. Registration is now open: https://store.york.ac.uk/product-catalogue/centre-for-medieval-studies/belonging-in-late-medieval-cities

 If you have any questions, please contact me via this email: jtr518@york.ac.uk

Stories of the Past and the Power of Memory’

A One-Day Research Symposium

University of Southampton

11th July 2019

The Memory Studies Research Cluster is delighted to announce this year’s one-day research symposium Stories of the Past and the Power of Memory will take place at the University of Southampton on 11th July 2019.

This will be an opportunity for all members of the DTP working on memory, and related subjects, to present their work and receive feedback from other researchers in a friendly and informal setting.

We invite abstracts for papers and ‘papers in progress’ from all disciplines related to this subject. Potential topics include, but are by no means limited to:

The construction of emotions and memory

  • Ancient and modern cognitive approaches to memory
  • Monuments and memories
  • Collective memories and emotions
  • Stories of the Past
  • The relationship between memory and narrative
  • Popular and ‘counter’ memory
  • Material culture and memory

 Closing date for submissions: 1st April 2019. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words to memorysw@gmail.com.  

 Lunch, tea and coffee will be provided. The DTP will reimburse travel expenses. 

 

Possibilities and Transformations in Arts, Design and Media


PGR Studio Conference


Friday 5th July 2019


The Parkside Building, Birmingham City University

Alchemies of Research is a one-day conference that invites you to consider your research as a site of transformation(s) and to
bring to the fore the various alchemies at play. It seeks to facilitate an interdisciplinary, supportive and innovative space of
exchange leading to unexpected alchemical outcomes themselves.

Submit proposals on 1 side of A4 (including visual material) or that take up to a minute to listen/watch that include:

- a title
- what you want to do and how it relates to the conference themes
- the form your contribution will take
- any technical or spatial requirements


Send your proposal to alchemiesofresearch@gmail.com by the deadline of 20th May 2019

We at White Rose College are organising Art as Commodities / Commodities as Art, an interdisciplinary conference to take place on 14 June 2019 at the University of York (see attached for flyers). Please note, the deadline is 29 March.

Papers are welcome across artistic media and geographic regions. In particular, we wish to cover the following topics:

  • The art and antiques market
  • Collecting, provenance and the “social life of things”
  • The materials of art
  • The value of artistic labour
  • Art and global trade/empire
  • Non-western art in Europe and vice-versa
  • Artistic representations of commodities, e.g. still life
  • The art of the Low Countries (Belgium and the Netherlands)

The conference is a unique opportunity to share one’s research in an under-explored field, and meet other like-minded scholars. Our keynote, Dr Leah Clark from the Open University, will be hosted by York’s Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies.

Generously funded by the White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities (WRoCAH/AHRC), we are able to fund travel (£75 for UK speakers) as well as overnight accommodation. Lunch and refreshments will be provided, together with dinner in town.

Please send a short speaker profile and an abstract of 300 words maximum to art.as.commodities@gmail.com by the above date. For further enquiries, please contact Adam Sammut, PhD candidate at the University of York, at anws500@york.ac.uk with “Art as commodities” in the subject header.

 https://www.york.ac.uk/history-of-art/news-and-events/events/2019/art-as-commodities/

 

‘Stories of the Past and the Power of Memory’

 

A One-Day Research Symposium

University of Southampton

11th July 2019

 

 The Memory Studies Research Cluster is delighted to announce this year’s one-day research symposium Stories of the Past and the Power of Memory will take place at the University of Southampton on 11th July 2019.

 This will be an opportunity for all members of the DTP working on memory, and related subjects, to present their work and receive feedback from other researchers in a friendly and informal setting.

 We invite abstracts for papers and ‘papers in progress’ from all disciplines related to this subject. Potential topics include, but are by no means limited to:

 The construction of emotions and memory

  • Ancient and modern cognitive approaches to memory
  • Monuments and memories
  • Collective memories and emotions
  • Stories of the Past
  • The relationship between memory and narrative
  • Popular and ‘counter’ memory
  • Material culture and memory

Closing date for submissions: 1st April 2019. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words to memorysw@gmail.com

 Lunch, tea and coffee will be provided. The DTP will reimburse travel expenses.

 

 

PILAS 2019 Annual Conference:

“Communities of Knowledge, Communities of Action”

 4-5th June 2019

University of York

Funded by the Society for Latin American Studies and the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of London

Call for papers

Deadline: April 16, 2019

Keynote speakers:

  • Professor Ben Bollig (University of Oxford)
  • Dr. Maria-Eugenia Giraudo (University of York)
  • Dr. Benjamin Smith (University of Warwick)
  • Dr. Katy Jenkins (Northumbria University)

 “Communities of Knowledge, Communities of Action” invites us to explore the crucial, albeit tenuous, relationship between knowledge formation and public action in Latin America. We invite contributions concerning subjects from any historical period or geographical location within the general scope of interest of Latin American Studies. Examples of contributions could involve, to name just a few, consideration of neoliberal practices of extractivism and research on anthropogenic climate change and renewable energy, the end of the Pink Tide, local and international initiatives to curb deforestation in the Amazon, comparing and “decolonising” the Ni Una Menos movement to #MeToo, the rising influence of para-police forces in urban peripheries and ongoing efforts to decolonise national literary and cultural canons. Indeed, the next PILAS conference wishes not only to carry out a reflection on such phenomena, but also engage in a dialogue with those who bring them to life. Attendance is free and panellists are required to be members of the Society of Latin American Studies (SLAS). For more information about SLAS membership, please go to https://www.slas.org.uk/.

 We invite abstracts on topics and disciplines including, but not limited to:

  • Visual Cultures
  • Literature, Languages and Translation Studies
  • Political and Social Sciences, International Relations and Development Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Environmental Studies
  • History
  • Women and Gender Studies
  • Race and Indigenous Studies

 We invite individual proposals for 20-minute papers, as well as proposals for panels (three 20-minute papers). Please send an abstract (200-300 words), a brief biography and 3 to 5 keywords to pilasconference@googlemail.com by 16th April 2019.

 A number of travel bursaries will be made available for postgraduate students who are members of SLAS. Please express your interest when submitting your abstract.

 Following the conference, delegates will be invited to submit their work for the proposal of a special issue of Bulletin of Latin American Research (BLAR)

Calling PhD students working working in or around the Arts:

JAWS is the only academic arts journal run by and dedicated to MA and Ph.D. students (and those who have recently graduated). We have published work by students from India, China, Australia, North America, Canada and the UK, and maintain an international peer-review network.


What We Want:
Theoretical and discursive essays up to 6000 words.
Critical reviews of events, exhibitions or performances up to 3000 words.
Submissions of practice accompanied by text. The word count for this type of submission can be negotiated through the peer review and editing process, but we recommend between 3000–5000 words. We strongly recommend authors consult our peer review guidance for unconventional submissions on our website prior to submitting, please see the link below.
All work must be sent in as a Word document to
rob@jawsjournal.com, and be prefaced with a 100-word abstract and 6–8 keywords, followed by a short contributor biography. Please include your university affiliation, full name, course and year of graduation. All work must use Harvard referencing, following Intellect House Style. For full submission guidelines and information about the peer review process we employ, please refer to
www.jawsjournal.com/submissions.


Deadline for submissions: Monday 22 April 2019.

 

We will be undertaking some essential maintenance on the VPP on 26 March 2019 with the system offline for a short period this afternoon. Thank you for your patience.

 

We at White Rose College are organising Art as Commodities / Commodities as Art, an interdisciplinary conference to take place on 14 June 2019 at the University of York (see attached for flyers). Please note, the deadline is 29 March.

Papers are welcome across artistic media and geographic regions. In particular, we wish to cover the following topics:

·         The art and antiques market

·         Collecting, provenance and the “social life of things”

·         The materials of art

·         The value of artistic labour

·         Art and global trade/empire

·         Non-western art in Europe and vice-versa

·         Artistic representations of commodities, e.g. still life

·         The art of the Low Countries (Belgium and the Netherlands)

The conference is a unique opportunity to share one’s research in an under-explored field, and meet other like-minded scholars. Our keynote, Dr Leah Clark from the Open University, will be hosted by York’s Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies.

Generously funded by the White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities (WRoCAH/AHRC), we are able to fund travel (£75 for UK speakers) as well as overnight accommodation. Lunch and refreshments will be provided, together with dinner in town.

Please send a short speaker profile and an abstract of 300 words maximum to art.as.commodities@gmail.com by the above date. For further enquiries, please contact Adam Sammut, PhD candidate at the University of York, at anws500@york.ac.uk with “Art as commodities” in the subject header.

https://www.york.ac.uk/history-of-art/news-and-events/events/2019/art-as-commodities/

 

4 July 2019 

 We warmly invite postgraduate researchers and ECRs to submit proposals for this symposium, to be held at the University of Birmingham and sponsored jointly by Midlands4Cities/University of Nottingham and the Centre for Reformation and Early Modern Studies at the University of Birmingham. 

In recent years, scholars have identified the concept of sociability as a fruitful avenue of research. Indeed, the practices of sociability were central to the functioning of early modern society, whether this was in elite, middling, or popular company; as a man or woman; at the royal court or an alehouse; or as a Protestant or Catholic. 

This conference aims to explore more broadly the character and the motives behind diverse forms of sociability, its mechanisms and spaces, and the contexts in which they emerged. To what extent did sociability change during a period that witnessed significant economic, political, religious, and social upheaval? 

Potential topics could include, but are no means limited to: 

- Sociability, power and politics 

- Places and spaces of sociability 

- Perceptions of good and bad sociability 

- Sociability and identity 

- The material culture of sociability 

-Sociability and the politics of inclusion and exclusion 

- Formal and informal sociability 

- Male and female sociability 

-The sociability of minority or persecuted groups 

- The methodologies of mapping early modern sociability 

Keynote speakers: Dr Felicity Heal, University of Oxford, and Professor Phil Withington, University of Sheffield. 

Please submit abstracts of 250 words (for papers of 20 minutes) to the organisers, Sophie Cope and Thomas Rose, by Friday 19 April 2019. Please send to ahxtjr@nottingham.ac.uk 

Travel bursaries of up to £50 are available for postgraduate researchers.

 

This one-day workshop will bring researchers in the arts, humanities and health sciences together to reflect on the ways in which different forms of digital, visual and textual representation can support health. Animation and data visualisation will be examined alongside written texts such as newspaper articles and recovery narratives. Both contemporary and historical contexts will be considered.

Professor Susan Hogan (University of Derby) will give the keynote lecture. Her Birth Project uses the arts to explore the impact of birth. One of its visual outputs, to be shown on the day, was nominated for the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Research in Film Awards.

Other highlights:

  • Woven Ink, whose animation on eating disorders and pregnancy with King’s College London won the CLAHRC Award for Communicating Research
  • Narrative Experiences Online (NEON), the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded study of online stories of personal recovery
  • Dr Elvira Perez Vallejos will lead a Flamenco-Yoga

workshop and explore its contribution to health

  • Penelope Mendonca, a graphic facilitator, will be visually capturing the key

points of discussion and presenting her research on Values-Based Cartooning

A limited number of travel bursaries will be available for external PhD and early-career researchers

Schedule and registration details will be announced. Students, researchers and health practitioners of all career stages will be welcomed. For other queries, contact jonathan.memel@nottingham.ac.uk or mark.pearson@nottingham.ac.uk

This event, organized by Jonathan Memel, Mark Pearson, Emma Putland and Heike Bartel, is funded by the University of Nottingham’s Health Humanities Research Priority Area.

 

Reminder: NTU’s Heritage Science dissemination day and workshop will take place from 27th to 29th March. If you are interested in pitching your thesis as part of the dissemination day then please contact Prof. Haida Liang as soon as possible.

  • On behalf of the European Research Infrastructure for Heritage Science (E-RIHS), NTU will be hosting a dissemination day at its City campus Nottingham on 27th March 2019. Details, including a booking link, can be accessed here.

  •  This will be followed on the 28th and 29th March 2019 by a two day Science and Heritage Interdisciplinary Research workshop, to take place at NTU’s Clifton campus. Details about this event, including a booking link, can be accessed here.      

 

We are pleased to be able to offer the opportunity to 32 M3C students the chance to gain a PRINCE2 Foundation qualification in project management.

PRINCE2 is extremely sought after as a world-wide project management methodology and holds significant potential add-on value to PhD students. Our PhDs are the largest projects many of us will ever manage but there is little capacity to formally capitalise on this to maximise our attractiveness to employers. This formal qualification is lifelong and relevant to careers both inside and outside academia. 94% of M3C students who completed the course last year thought it was valuable for their future career path.

To find out more and book your place, please visit: PRINCE2 Foundation Course