Blog from June, 2019

Fellowship Opportunities at the Yale Center for British Art

The Paul Mellon Centre invites you to mingle with your colleagues and enjoy a glass of wine while learning about fellowship opportunities for doctoral students and early-career scholars at the Yale Center for British Art.

The Center (located in New Haven, Connecticut, USA) is home to the largest collection of British art outside the United Kingdom and offers research placements  through the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council’s international placement schemes and through its own residential scholars program. More information on the Center's programs can be found here.


When: Thursday, June 27, 2019, 16:30–19:30

Where: The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art

16 Bedford Square

London, WC1B 3JA

T: 020 7580 0311
 

 

Shout out for interest - craft/making/amateur creativity research?

My name is Clare Daněk and I’m an AHRC-funded doctoral student based at the University of Leeds, where I’m busy doing some very hands-on research into how people learn amateur craft skills. 

My DTP (WRoCAH, comprising the Universities of York, Leeds and Sheffield) is full of interesting people, but I haven’t come across other researchers within the DTP whose research falls into the area of craft/making/amateur creativity – so I’m spreading the net wider.  

I’d love to hear from other AHRC-funded doctoral researchers to discuss potential connections, conversation, collaboration about craft/making/amateur creativity/that sort of thing, with a view to developing a network and maybe an event.  

Drop me a line at pc14cjd@leeds.ac.uk and we can start the conversation.

 

The British Library, London

The AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership working group will host a BAME Doctoral Researchers Event on 8th July at the British Library to showcase and celebrate the work being done by our BAME researchers.

This event follows on from the first BAME Doctoral Researchers Consultation Event hosted by North West Consortium DTP at the University of Manchester in December 2018.

Confirmed Speakers for the Opening Panel are Dr. Nicole King, Lecturer at Goldsmiths & Dr. Emma Abotsi, British Sociological Association Fellow at the British Library.

Call for presentations

The AHRC Doctoral Training Partnerships invite BAME doctoral researchers in the Arts and Humanities across the UK to present short, research-in-progress papers on any aspect of their research at an event to celebrate and showcase BAME doctoral research. This call is open to all BAME researchers, whether funded by a DTP or not. The program allows for 10 presentations - should we receive more than ten paper proposals, we’ll give priority to third and second year researchers - and then make plans for a repeat event.

Presenters are free to choose whether or not their presentation will directly address the challenges and/or opportunities of being a BAME researcher - and should be no longer than 15-minutes to allow for discussion and reflection.

If you would prefer not to present a paper but would like to be involved in chairing or acting as a respondent, please indicate this in the Eventbrite registration form.

Non-BAME doctoral researchers are warmly invited to attend this event.

Please include an indicative title and a 250-word outline of roughly what you will be speaking on in the Eventbrite registration form, or send this to enquiries@chase.ac.uk, by Friday 21 June.

 

Job Title: Masterclass Intern

June 2019

Accountable to: Clothworkers’ Associate in Mathematics

Location: Albemarle St, London with some travel to Masterclass locations within London and the South East

Contract type: 12 week internship – Full time – 35 hours per week with weekend working.

End September to December 2019

Salary: Payable by Stipend by Research Council or DTP – funding should be agreed before application.

 

Job Purpose
This placement is aimed at anyone who is passionate about sharing their love for the STEM subjects, particularly mathematics, and who wishes to develop their skills in delivering activities to young people as well as supporting one of the UK’s longest-running educational programmes.
You will join the Ri during our busy autumn term and support the team to administer and deliver our programme of Masterclasses with a particular focus on Secondary Mathematics Masterclasses in London, and will have opportunities to develop and deliver your own workshops.

Job Purpose
This placement is aimed at anyone who is passionate about sharing their love for the STEM subjects, particularly mathematics, and who wishes to develop their skills in delivering activities to young people as well as supporting one of the UK’s longest-running educational programmes.
You will join the Ri during our busy autumn term and support the team to administer and deliver our programme of Masterclasses with a particular focus on Secondary Mathematics Masterclasses in London, and will have opportunities to develop and deliver your own workshops.

 

For further detail, please see the attached job description.

 

Austerity Gardens: The Poetics and Politics of Gardening in Hard Times

Trent B46, 4pm, Wednesday 19thJune

Dr Naomi Milthorpe, University of Tasmania

What does it mean to garden in hard times, and why might humans turn to the garden (as shelter, refuge, or productive space) under straitened conditions? How do poets, writers and cultural critics contend with and represent the garden or their own gardening as they are changed by austerity? What does an austere garden look, feel, sound, taste, and smell like?

Gardens are liminal spaces, private zones, and contested sites, mobilized against foreign invaders whether human or nonhuman. Gardens and gardening are in place and practice revelatory of shifting, contingent, and multiple modes of gender, class, racial, religious and sexual identity. They are idealized, yet ever-incomplete, utopian sites. Gardening is also big business: 2017 market reports indicated increased demand for DIY products in the decade since the global financial crisis (“Millennials Dominate” 2017). Thus gardening and garden literature provides rich soil for understanding the commodification and uses of culture, whether highbrow or popular, as embodied in gardening from the mid-to- late 20th century and beyond.

Austerity is an historically-inflected concept associated most particularly with the policies of World War Two Britain, and latterly, Europe following the Global Financial Crisis, but its ideological, aesthetic, and practical roots stretch beyond those particular historical and geographical contexts. This paper will seek to map out some of the borders of austerity gardening, and particularly, its representation and practice in popular and literary texts.

Naomi Milthorpe is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Tasmania. Her research centres on modernist, interwar, and mid-century British literary culture. Naomi is the author of Evelyn Waugh’s Satire: Texts and Contexts(FDUP, 2016), and is currently editing Waugh’s Black Mischief for the Oxford University Press Complete Works of Evelyn Waugh. She is the editor of the essay collection The Poetics and Politics of Gardening in Hard Times (Lexington, forthcoming) which features diverse essays on Vita Sackville-West, Beverley Nichols, nettles, thylacines, and many other topics exploring the material, affective and representational effects of austerity in the garden and garden writing.

 

The SPLAS FORUM 2019 is taking place at the University of Nottingham on the 21st 22nd June! To see the programme and register please visit:: https://splasforum2019.wordpress.com/programme/